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    VACCINATION AGAINST PAPILLOMA VIRUSES (HPV)

    Human papillomaviruses can cause cancer - The vaccine provides protection

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine with the Gardasil9® vaccine Gardasil 9 is a vaccine for children from the age of 9, adolescents and adults. It is given as a protection against diseases caused by HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58. These diseases are cancer precursors and cancer of the female reproductive organs (cervix, outer female genitals and vagina), precancerous lesions and cancer of the anus and genital warts in both men and women.

     

    How is vaccinated?

    If you are between 9 and 14 years old at the time of the first injection Gardasil 9 can be administered following a 2-dose regimen:

    • First injection: at a chosen time

    • Second injection: administered between 5 and 13 months after the first injection

    If you are 15 years or older at the time of the first injection Gardasil 9 should be administered following a 3-dose regimen:

    • First injection: at a chosen time

    • Second injection: 2 months after the first injection (not earlier than one month after the first dose)

    • Third injection: 6 months after the first injection (not earlier than 3 months after the second dose)

    • All three doses should be given within a 1-year period.

     

    Is the vaccine safe?

    Like all vaccines, this vaccine can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

    The following side effects may be observed after administration of Gardasil 9:

    • Very common (may affect more than 1 in 10 people): side effects at the injection site (pain, swelling and redness) and headache

    • Common (may affect up to 1 in 10 people): side effects at the injection site (bruising and itching), fever, tiredness, dizziness and nausea When Gardasil 9 was co-administered with a combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (acellular, component), and poliomyelitis (inactivated) booster vaccine, injection site swelling was reported more frequently.